RE Today Services news https://retoday.org.uk/news/feed/rss RE Today Services works nationally and internationally to support Religious Education in schools. RE Today is wholly owned by the charity Christian Education, and is committed to the teaching of the major world faiths. Wed, 07 Nov 2018 14:41:00 +0000 Wanted: Regional RE Networks Ambassador - part time contract https://retoday.org.uk/news/regional-re-ambassador https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/530 Wed, 07 Nov 2018 14:41:00 +0000 Regional RE Networks Ambassador - part time contract
RE Today Services - Birmingham, West Midlands

£250.00 per day / 1 day per month (approx.)

RE Today Services and NATRE are running a 2-year project to build a national support infrastructure for Religious Education.

Key to this project are 10 x part-time contracts to take the lead in each region – helping shape the project and then manage the project, budget, deliverables and reporting.

Key Aim: These are the regional lead roles for development, encouragement and co-ordination of regional RE support structures.

Key Impact Measure: grow the number of school teachers engaged in local RE groups (inc. NATRE affiliated Local Groups and LTLRE Hubs) – encourage and equip them in their classroom practice and connect to high quality local, regional and national RE resources and supported through face-to-face contact.

Contract: 12 days/year (approx 1 day/month) from January 2019 – August 2020

Location: working from home, so any location in England considered, to match the regions listed below. The role will require travel throughout the region, and occasional visits to our company offices in Birmingham.

Application Closing Date: Please email your CV to mike@retoday.org.uk by 5pm Friday 16th November 2018, along with the Region(s) that you are applying for.

Interviews: By telephone week commencing 26th November 2018 with face to face interviews during December:

· Monday 10th December - Birmingham

· Tuesday 11th December - London

· Tuesday 18th December - Manchester

Click here for more information, including contract aims and key experience.

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Student wins national art competition https://retoday.org.uk/news/student-wins-national-art-competition https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/529 Thu, 18 Oct 2018 11:54:00 +0000  Scarlett-Millar-and-Emma-Owen-Davies.jpg
(pictured LtoR Scarlett Millar and Emma Owen Davies, Assistant Head teacher from Shrewsbury High School)

Scarlett Millar from Shrewsbury High School is one of the winners of national art competition ‘Spirited Arts – Art in Heaven’ held annually by the National Association of Teachers of Religious Education (NATRE). Over 2000 students were selected from schools from across the UK and entered ‘Spirited Arts’ this year, to get people thinking about Religious Education (RE) through art.

In its 15th year, this competition has attracted over 320,000 participants averaging 20,000 partakers per year since 2004. Hundreds of UK schools get involved, with entries coming from as far afield as Cyprus and Australia, Indonesia and South Africa.

The annual competition starts at the beginning of every school year and runs through to 31 July, to enable teachers to incorporate the art competition into their RE lessons. Many schools have an ‘Art in Heaven’ unit of work, or a special learning RE/arts week.

Scarlett’s artwork was based on the theme ‘Doubt or Faith’ and she calls her piece ‘Look up to the light’.

Scarlett Millar aged 13 comments:

‘For the spirited art competition, I have chosen doubt and faith. I chose this because I doubt myself all the time about lots of things, mostly small things like appearance but sometimes also larger issues. However, faith always helps me to get through. I love the Spirited Arts competition because it helps me express my feelings and emotions, whilst thinking about religion and faith’.

Emma Owen Davies, Assistant Head teacher from Shrewsbury High School gives her thoughts on the competition:

‘We are delighted that Scarlett has been recognised as a winner and are very proud of all of our student entries.
The students and I look forward to the Spirited Arts competition every year, because even though this is an art competition catalysed by the RE subject association it not only provides an opportunity to think critically about current affairs and values but it also provides a great platform for cross-curricular activity combining subjects like Art, RE, Literacy and even History, which allows our students to explore different ways of learning.’

Judging took place over the summer by RE Today Adviser, Lat Blaylock and Artist, Carly Brown and High stride Society.

Lat Blaylock comments on the competition as a whole:

‘Spirited Arts is in its 15th year and has attracted over 320,000 participants averaging 20,000 participants per year since 2004, with hundreds of UK schools get involved. Every year the entries are a pleasure to see because they show that children and young people are doing vital thinking about the big issues of beliefs and values through their school RE. Young people from 3-19 express themselves with astonishing depth and clarity. Well done to all pupils and teachers involved.

When some people are cynical about the young and others think religion is out of date, I dare them to look at our web galleries of pupil art and remain unmoved.’

Scarlett’s entry can be found here:
www.natre.org.uk/about-natre/projects/spirited-arts/spirited-arts-gallery/2018/look-up-to-the-light/

All the winners and some entries from 2018 can be found on the Spirited Arts gallery:
www.natre.org.uk/about-natre/projects/spirited-arts/spirited-arts-gallery/2018/

The 2019 Spirited Arts competition is now open to see the new themes and submit your entry visit:
www.natre.org.uk/about-natre/projects/spirited-arts/spirited-arts-2019/

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Wanted: National RE Networks Ambassador - part time https://retoday.org.uk/news/job-vacancy-national-re-networks-ambassador-part-time https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/528 Tue, 25 Sep 2018 15:42:00 +0000 National RE Networks Ambassador - part time RE Today Services - Birmingham, West Midlands
£250.00 per day / 1 day per week (approx.)

RE Today Services and NATRE are running a 2-year project to build a national support infrastructure for Religious Education.

Key to this project is a part-time contract to take the national lead – helping shape the project, identify up to 10 regional Ambassadors and then manage the project, budget, deliverables and reporting.

View National_Lead_job_description.pdf

Application Closing Date: 12 October 2018

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Welcome to our new RE Adviser https://retoday.org.uk/news/welcome-to-our-new-re-adviser https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/527 Wed, 12 Sep 2018 15:59:00 +0000  Angela-Hill.jpg Angela joins us with over a decade of experience as an RE teacher, as well as a background in the financial services industry. Most recently, she taught at one of Wales’ most successful secondary schools, where she was a Lead Practitioner for the Central South Consortium’s Curriculum Hub and where she also previously served as Head of RE and as Head of Year 12. In addition to being an experienced RE teacher, Angela also undertook a successful national project for Wales’ longest-established educational charity, the Council for Education in World Citizenship (CEWC), where she developed an expertise in Philosophy for Children, working with primary and secondary schools across Wales.

Angela has extensive knowledge of external examinations in Religious Studies in England in Wales. As well as being a longstanding examiner, she has provided training throughout England for Eduqas and has undertaken extensive consultancy and authorship contracts to support the reformed qualifications. She has also co-authored commercial textbooks to support the new GCSE in Wales.

Passionate about making RE excellent for all, Angela is an active member of the Cardiff SACRE and is looking forward to working with teachers across the UK and increasing access to RE Today’s fantastic work for teachers in Wales.

Email: angela@retoday.org.uk

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Press release: NATRE response to the report of the Commission on RE https://retoday.org.uk/news/press-release-natre-response-to-the-report-of-the-commission-on-re https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/526 Wed, 12 Sep 2018 10:14:00 +0000 Commission on Religious Education Final Report

Religions and Worldviews: The way forward

A National Plan for RE


A response from NATRE


The long-awaited final report of the 14-member independent Commission on RE, published on Sunday, sets out a vision for a National Entitlement for all children in all state funded schools.

Ben Wood, Chair of The National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE) commented:

“Over the last three years,  NATRE has argued for a statement of national entitlement, so we are pleased to see that this forms part of the Commission’s recommendations. The Commission’s entitlement statement is bold and seeks to reshape the subject in a new way. This will no doubt elicit much debate.”

The proposed change in the name of the subject from Religious Education to Religion and Worldviews, is perhaps the most eye-catching of the Commission’s recommendations, but NATRE believes the recommendations focusing on the purpose and content of study are much more significant, and it is in these areas that teachers will look to engage in discussion and debate. Commenting on this aspect of the report, Mr Wood points out that the inclusion of non-religious worldviews is not a new development;

“The Commission’s call for a more clearly identified place for study of non-religious worldviews, as well as its recognition of the importance of studying both institutionalised worldviews and personal autonomy, reflects current practice in many schools where RE is taught well, and is a feature of most locally agreed syllabuses.

It is essential in a subject called Religion and Worldviews, that pupils engage with the religions and worldviews in a study of, what the Commission describes as, ‘institutional worldviews’ and ‘personal worldviews’, thus coming to understand the diversity of practice, belief, value and commitment.”

The report from the Commission also calls on the Government to provide legal clarification on the right of withdrawal. NATRE has been working closely with Teacher Unions and others on this matter. Mr Wood explains;

“The Commission makes a sensible recommendation concerning the right of withdrawal. The right of withdrawal is being abused and used in a way that runs opposite to the intentions of the government in promoting a cohesive society. This recommendation should be acted upon quickly by the Department for Education in a way that both supports the government’s priorities and ensures that all pupils are given the right to learn about the religions and worldviews that are so influential in our society.”

Mr Wood concludes:

“NATRE is looking forward to working positively with our partners for the benefit of pupils in all kinds of schools. We believe the voice of teachers now becomes especially important in taking our subject forward. Teachers must be involved at the centre of debates and discussions about the direction of the subject, both in considering the nature and purpose of the subject, and in effectively designing and implementing new programmes of study.”

For media enquiries, contact:

Mubina Khan-Daniels, RE Today Services
Tel: 0121 415 3970 / 0121 458 3313
Email: mubina@retoday.org.uk

National Association of Teachers of RE

NATRE is the subject teacher association for RE professionals in primary and secondary schools and higher education, providing a representative voice at national level and publications and courses to promote professional development. NATRE’s Executive consists of a majority of serving teachers from primary and secondary schools who are elected for a three-year term of service.

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Warning of ‘factory-farmed kids’ as curriculum narrows with EBacc https://retoday.org.uk/news/warning-of-factory-farmed-kids-as-curriculum-narrows-with-ebacc https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/525 Thu, 23 Aug 2018 11:49:00 +0000 GCSE entries to subjects outside the Government’s EBacc school performance
measure slide

The number of entries from students in England taking GCSEs in subjects that are not included in the EBacc – the school performance measure introduced in 2010 by then-Secretary of State for Education Michael Gove, in one year has fallen by 11.1% from 2017 to 2018, while the number of entries in EBacc subjects has risen by 4.5%. A group of organisations representing subjects outside the EBacc is warning that this narrowing of the school curriculum risks producing ‘factory-farmed kids’ who lack a broader range of vital knowledge, skills and interests. It follows concerns cited last week over a decline in entries to non-EBacc subjects at A level, with a drop in overall entries of 7.79% in design and technology and 22.4% decline in religious studies.

The EBacc requires that pupils take English language and literature, maths, a modern language, a science (including computer science), and history or geography at GCSE. Schools are measured on the number of pupils that take GCSEs in EBacc subjects and these subjects are prioritised when schools are compared in relation to the amount of progress pupils make. At least 70% of a school’s score comes from results in EBacc subjects. The Government’s target is for 90% of all GCSE pupils to choose the EBacc subject combination by 2025. It is unsurprising therefore, that most school leaders prioritise these subjects in the timetable, sometimes allocating more time for teachers to complete GCSE courses in EBacc subjects than for those not included in this measure. Subjects outside the EBacc therefore can often be either completely excluded from the 14-16 curriculum or find themselves competing for space in a single timetable slot.

However, leaders of six subject organisations representing religious education, art and design, design and technology, citizenship, and drama are concerned about the dangers of a narrower curriculum caused by schools feeling under pressure to force pupils to take subjects they are less interested in or have less aptitude for. As a result, pupils are not being allowed to explore other vital disciplines that create balanced, rounded individuals who are prepared for the challenges and demands of modern life.

Rudolf Eliott Lockhart Chief Executive of the Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC) said, “While the Government’s ambitions to produce pupils with an ability in a core set of subjects are laudable, the unintended consequence of the EBacc measure is that essential knowledge and skills are being lost and we risk producing factory-farmed kids, who are compelled to take a narrow range of subjects simply to satisfy Government targets.”

Ben Wood, Chair of the National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE), adds: “The EBacc fails to recognise the value of the knowledge and skills beyond its core disciplines and, as there are only so many hours in a school week and school leaders understandably concentrate on what is being measured, students’ choice is being restricted.”

The group points to major employers, which have publicly stated the importance of broader skills. Google, for example, used to hire only computer scientists with top grades from elite universities. But, after examining its employee data, concluded that the eight most important qualities of success were in fact those associated with broader skills, including critical thinking, insights into others, creativity, and problem solving. The company subsequently broadened its recruitment policy to include humanities majors, artists, and MBAs.

Liz Moorse, Chief Executive, The Association for Citizenship Teaching (ACT) adds, “Recruiters such as Google are recognising that, while STEM subjects are important, wider knowledge and a broader skillset are equally important in a modern democracy and multicultural society.

“It’s vital that we safeguard against a narrowing of the curriculum that will leave students educationally impoverished, employers limited in their choice of candidates, and our society culturally worse off.”

Tony Ryan, Chief Executive, The Design and Technology Association, said: “The very nature of our subject is often misunderstood. At its best, D&T takes knowledge gained elsewhere on the curriculum, adds context and subject specific content and allows students to apply themselves to solve real problems, thus enhancing peoples’ lives. The application of this ‘design thinking’ is a high order skill set that is increasingly demanded within business and industry and which has to be taught and practiced.

“In a world increasingly dominated by technology, robots, artificial intelligence and virtual reality. A recent report by the World Economic Forum (WEF) identified the three skill sets deemed most important for employability as being; complex problem solving, critical thinking and creativity. These same skills can be found at the very heart of every design and technology department.”

Lesley Butterworth, General Secretary of the National Society for Education in Art and Design (NSEAD), commented, “A young person who has achieved this qualification in art and design has a portfolio of skills and knowledge fit for purpose for the challenges of the 21st century. Participation and engagement in art, craft and design at this level of education gives a unique and meaningful experience, developing transferable skills and personal expression, building confidence and self-esteem and signposting to career paths in the creative, cultural, digital media and heritage industries.

“Engagement in art, craft and design gives young people a stake in the future.”

Chris Lawrence, Trustee for National Drama, added: “Learning through drama is a natural human process engaged with at a very early age - our brains are ‘wired’ for it. We recognise it as a powerful pedagogy and a creative process that provides a compelling means of exploration, expression and making meaning. Through it we learn what it is to be a human being. We believe that restricting its availability to children, such as in the current EBacc, deprives them of a means to further develop their human potential.”

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For media enquiries please contact:

Colin Hallmark, 3:nine Communications:

Tel: 0207 736 1888

Email: info@3nine.co.uk

Notes for editors:

Data analysis methodology

The Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) data does not give a combined figure for entries in EBacc subjects. Figures have been calculated by taking the total entries in the categories JCQ describes as Additional Science, Additional Science (Further), Biology, Chemistry, Classical Subjects, Computing, English, English Literature, French, Geography, German, History, Irish, Maths, Physics, Science, Science: Double Award, Spanish, and Other Modern Foreign Languages.

The Department for Education definition of the EBacc: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-baccalaureate-eligible-qualifications

National Association of Teachers of RE
NATRE is the subject teacher association for RE professionals in primary and secondary schools and higher education, providing a representative voice at national level and publications and courses to promote professional development. NATRE’s Executive consists of a majority of serving teachers from primary and secondary schools who are elected for a three-year term of service.

Religious Education Council of England and Wales

Established in 1973, the Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC) brings together over 60 national organisations. These comprise academic and professional associations specialising in religions and religious education, as well as individual religion and belief organisations inclusive of the range of faith communities found nationally, including Humanists UK.

The Association for Citizenship Teaching (ACT)

Established in 2001, ACT is the subject association for all those involved in teaching Citizenship in primary and secondary schools and is the voice for Citizenship education nationally. Citizenship has been a National Curriculum and GCSE subject in England since 2002. ACT offers expert subject and curriculum advice, training and continuing professional development, networking and conferences, quality assured resources and publishes the journal ‘Teaching Citizenship’ twice a year.

The National Society for Education in Art and Design

NSEAD is the lead professional body for teachers of art, craft and design across all phases throughout the UK. As a trade union, subject association and learned society we welcome everyone into membership who shares and celebrates our values.

The Design and Technology Association

The Design and Technology Association supports, develops and promotes high-quality design and technology teaching and learning as an essential part of the rounded education of all young people. We link schools and students with the world of business, manufacturing and industry and lobby government and key decision makers to ensure that the subject’s value is duly recognised and supported.

National Drama

National Drama, the UK’s leading professional association for drama teachers and theatre educators, is a charity dedicated to ensuring that all children and young people have the opportunity to learn about and through drama. National Drama is also a member of other associations connected with the arts including the International Drama and Theatre Education Association (IDEA), the Council for Subject Associations and the Bacc for the Future campaign.

GCSE results

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Religious Studies A level entries decline by 22.8% as the subject is squeezed out of the curriculum https://retoday.org.uk/news/religious-studies-a-level-entries-decline-by-22.8-as-the-subject-is-squeezed-out-of-the-curriculum https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/524 Fri, 17 Aug 2018 09:36:00 +0000 ’...Congratulations and thanks must also go to their teachers who have worked tirelessly to ensure that students can reach their full potential in this reformed A level. It is of little surprise to those of us who teach RS that it remains popular amongst young people, however it is very disappointing to see that the number of entries has dropped by over 20%...’ Ben Wood, Chair, NATRE.

At a time when Religious Education is more important than ever, with the need for community integration in our diverse society, it is concerning to see a significant drop in the number of young people taking Religious Studies at A level in England and Wales. The drop in RS entries by 22.8% is disappointing given the subject’s popularity has grown in recent years. Despite this reduction in entries for RS, there are still 65% more entries than in 2003 (11,132 entries were recorded in 2003).

The key outcomes of the 2018 A level results in England and Wales for Religious Education are as follows:

•18,422 RS A level entries were recorded, a decrease of 22.8% on 2017.
•The decrease in RS A level entries is an extreme example of a broader pattern of decreasing entries for humanities and social science subjects (English language down 14.8% across the UK, Geography down 11.3%, History down 2.7%) while entries for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths (STEM) subjects have increased (Chemistry up 3.4% across the UK, Physics up 3.4%, Biology up 3.1%, and Maths up 2.5%).
•Overall the number of A-level entries across England and Wales has dropped by 1.8% on 2017. This is related to the smaller cohort of students taking A levels this year with a decrease in the number of 18-year-olds in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland of 3.5% on 2017, and also due to fewer pupils taking four A-levels.
•There were 6,024 entries for RS at AS level, a decrease of 63% on 2017; this reflects the decline across all subjects where the number of AS entries fell by 55% across England and Wales (as AS level grades no longer count towards A levels under the linear scheme).
•22.4% of entries for RS A level were awarded an A or an A* with 4.6% of RS entries awarded the top A* grade.

The dramatic fall in the number of Religious Studies A level entries in England and Wales comes after warnings in recent years of insufficient action to support the subject. In 2017 the RE Council of England and Wales (REC) and the National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE) published analysis based on data from the Department for Education showing that 28% of secondary schools in England report that they are not meeting their statutory obligation to teach religious education (RE).

The decline in entries is surprising given that Religious Studies at A level continues to be a favourable gateway to university and jobs. The importance of RS A level as a subject for Higher Education entry and for graduate recruiters is increasingly recognised by independent bodies. Whilst RS A level is not listed by The Russell Group as a ‘facilitating subject’, The Russell Group of top universities has made it clear that RS A level provides ‘suitable preparation for entry to university generally’, and both Oxford and Cambridge University include Religious Studies in the top level list of ‘generally suitable Arts A levels’.

In fact, almost 21% of students admitted to Oxford University to study English and 13.5% admitted to study History in 2015 had an RS A level, more than those with Economics, Physics and Business Studies A levels.1

Employers recognise the value of religious literacy. For example, in February 2017, EY announced the creation of Religious Literacy for Organisations (RLO), a diversity and inclusion training programme designed to help organisations better understand religious inclusion and its positive impact on business process and performance.

Career prospects for those that take Religious Studies/Philosophy at degree level are also very bright due to developing a strong academic skillset with transferable skills attractive to employers. In 2015/16, 16.5% of Philosophy graduates entered the professional sector in the fields of Business, HR and Finance, compared to 10% for all disciplines. With 13% of graduates going on to work in the fields of legal, social and welfare, 6.8% choosing to become educational professionals and 4.6% managers.2

The drop in the number of pupils taking A level and AS level Religious Studies is all the more concerning at a time when there is a shortfall in recruitment for teacher training in Religious Education. Evidence collected by the National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE) suggests that headteachers are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit RE specialists.

The Commission on Religious Education established to review the legal, education and policy frameworks for religious education in schools will present its final report findings to government next month to address the current challenges faced by Religious Education in England today.

Comment from Ben Wood, Chair, National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE)


“Congratulations to the many students receiving their Religious Studies results today. These results are the product of their hard work grappling with some of the most difficult questions to ever puzzle humankind, and I am sure that they will feel the benefits of studying RS for many years to come. Congratulations and thanks must also go to their teachers who have worked tirelessly to ensure that students can reach their full potential in this reformed A level. It is of little surprise to those of us who teach RS that it remains popular amongst young people, however it is very disappointing to see that the number of entries has dropped by over 20%. This devastating fall has been expected given successive policy decisions that have failed to maintain and support the position of RS as part of a broad and balanced curriculum. RS A level is an excellent preparation for both further study and for entering the world of work. It is a subject that helps young people gain access to a wide range of degree courses, and it is valued by employers, with the subject matter and approach of an RS A level helping to equip students with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to succeed in modern Britain.”


Comment from Rudolf Eliott Lockhart, Chief Executive, Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC):


“At a time when our increasingly diverse society makes high quality religious education more important than ever, it is deeply concerning to see such a dramatic fall in the number of Religious Studies A level entries. It is, however, an unsurprising consequence of policy decisions such as the exclusion of RS from key performance indicators at GCSE, insufficient bursary provision to encourage people to train to become RE teachers, and a lack of action to hold schools to account when they fail to teach RE. Last year the REC and NATRE highlighted that 28% of secondary schools in England report that they do not meet their basic statutory duty to teach RE. Today’s figures are further evidence of the critical need for decisive action to be taken. Next month will see the publication of the Commission on Religious Education’s final report: I hope that the Government will be keen to take heed of its recommendations and work with us to secure the future of high quality education about religions and belief in this country.”

 

Notes: GCE A level results of A level candidates in England and Wales.

Source: Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ)

Download full media release which includes A level entries in RS in England and Wales, 2003 to 2018


-ends-

For media enquiries, contact:

Sarah Leahy, 3:nine Communications:

Tel: 01403 563 452 / 07495 926 351

Email: sarahjleahy@gmail.com

Mubina Khan-Daniels, RE Today Services | NATRE

Tel: 0121 415 3970 / 0121 458 3313

Email: mubina@retoday.org.uk
 

Notes for editors:


1 A level RS and Uni admission 2015

2 Data collected for “What do graduates do? 2015/16 Higher Education Career Services Unit www.hecsu.ac.uk

3 Due to a change in the way that JCQ present the data, figures for 2003 to 2015 include entries from candidates in the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man, figures for 2016 and 2017 do not. This change has a relatively small impact on the time series data. 2016 is the only year in which it is possible to measure the impact of this methodological change: there were 117 entries for Religious Studies from candidates in the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man suggesting that the impact of the change will be very slight.


National Association of Teachers of RE

NATRE is the subject teacher association for RE professionals in primary and secondary schools and higher education, providing a representative voice at national level and publications and courses to promote professional development. NATRE’s Executive consists of a majority of serving teachers from primary and secondary schools who are elected for a three-year term of service.

Religious Education Council of England and Wales

Established in 1973, the Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC) brings together over 60 national organisations. These comprise academic and professional associations specialising in religions and religious education, as well as individual religion and belief organisations inclusive of the range of faith communities found nationally, including Humanists UK.

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Job vacancy: Finance Assistant https://retoday.org.uk/news/finance-assistant-job-vacancy https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/523 Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:31:00 +0000 RE Today / Christian Education is an education charity and company limited by guarantee. It has a number of business strands, including publishing, consultancy in Religious Education throughout the UK, and international work through the ‘International Bible Reading Association’ (IBRA), as well as providing management, membership and marketing services to the ‘National Association of Teachers of Religious Education’ (NATRE). It is a progressive and growing organisation across all the strands.

We are looking for a Finance Assistant to join our friendly and busy team. You will assist in day to day processing within all areas of the department as outlined below.

Download job description: Finance_Assistant_July_2018.pdf

Please send your CV with a covering letter outlining your relevant skills
to:

Ms Zoë Keens, CEO
Christian Education, 5-6 Imperial Court, 12 Sovereign Road, Birmingham B30 3FH
Email:  zoe.keens@christianeducation.org.uk

If you have any questions or queries please contact Chris Ginty, Finance Manager 0121 415 3971

Closing date:  5pm Wednesday 25 July 2018
Interview date:  Monday 30 July 2018

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20:20 RE – practice, policy and powerful knowledge https://retoday.org.uk/news/2020-re-practice-policy-and-powerful-knowledge https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/522 Tue, 03 Jul 2018 09:49:00 +0000 Date: Saturday 13 – Sunday 14 October 2018
Location: De Vere Cranage Estate Hotel, Crewe
Price: £175
Booking: Complete the booking form below and book your place today!

This joint conference between AREIAC, AULRE, NASACRE and NATRE brings together the wider RE community, including primary and secondary classroom teachers, advisers, academics, inspectors, SACRE members and everyone interested in RE.

20:20 RE will be the first national RE event after the publication of the crucial report from the Commission on RE. What better time to bring practice, policy and powerful knowledge together to deliver the best RE for all?

Conference themes include:

• how can RE deliver powerful knowledge and positive attitudes to address the unprecedented levels of hate speech, hate crime, division and suspicion in our country?

• how can schools make best use of their statutory duty to offer great RE to all pupils?

• how should RE respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by the new GCSE and A-level specifications?

With 3 keynote addresses and up to 40 breakout sessions including seminars and academic papers, 20:20 RE balances practical classroom ideas with the latest academic research and policy.

This is an event not to be missed!

Conference price includes: Accommodation, all meals and refreshments, downloadable hand-outs and presentations from all.

To book your place visit the NATRE website

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Get a FREE RE book when you join NATRE! https://retoday.org.uk/news/get-a-free-re-book-when-you-join-natre https://retoday.org.uk/news/permalink/521 Fri, 11 May 2018 11:45:00 +0000 Are you struggling to develop creative classroom activities to enthuse your pupils/students in every RE lesson?

Would you like to receive tried and tested ready-to-use RE lesson ideas?

Join NATRE today and receive the latest book from one of our best-selling RE curriculum series, packed with classroom activities for your RE lessons!

Along with your FREE book you will receive all these amazing benefits to support you and your school in delivering excellent RE:

•Termly REtoday magazine (including Professional REflection, the journal of NATRE), which focuses on classroom practice and current RE-related news and developments
•Termly curriculum book from our latest series, with practical classroom activities
•Monthly e-newsletters
•Downloadable resources straight to your inbox*
•Access to advice from RE Advisers
•Huge discounts on a variety of CPD opportunities*
•Termly primary and secondary online seminars*
•Discounted fee to our national conferences
•Termly head teacher and governor e-briefings*
•Assessment guidance*
•Subject leaders’ toolkit*
•Exemplar policy documents*
•15% off Articles of Faith
•Exclusive online access to BJRE articles.
•Discounts in NATRE lifestyle benefits*
•And over 1,000 resources available online.

What Next?

1.Choose your membership package using this helpful online tool

2.Then choose either your FREE primary or secondary curriculum book

3.Join NATRE via the following options and remember to quote: NATREFREEBOOK18

  a) BUY ONLINE

(Please make sure the chosen membership & book are both in the basket when adding your discount code).

To be invoiced or if you have any queries:

  b) EMAIL

  c) CALL: 0121 458 3313

NATRE membership is subject to our terms and conditions and is only available to schools & individuals based in the UK

Miss it, Miss out – Offer ends 20 July 2018

*dependent on membership package selected

Terms and conditions
•If payment for the NATRE membership has not been received within 30 days, cost of the curriculum book will be due.
•A list of all free curriculum books to choose from is available here. Will be posted out with your welcome pack.
•This offer is only available to new NATRE members (those that have not been a NATRE member for 12 months or more).

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